Resources


Emergency Resources  |  Self-Help Resources  |  Drug and Alcohol Resources  | 
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counseling resources

Emergency Contacts and Local Resources

University Emergency (843) 208-8911
Department of Public Safety (843) 208-8912
University Counselor (Weekdays 8:30 am – 5pm) (843) 208-8264
University Housing (Weekdays 8:30 am – 5pm) (843) 208-8722
Coastal Carolina Hospital - Local (843) 784-8000
Beaufort Memorial Hospital - Local (843) 522-5269
Hilton Head Regional Hospital - Local (843) 681-6122
Community Crisis Response & Intervention 24/7 - Local (833) 364-2274
Hopeful Horizons – (DV/Sexual Assault) - Local (843) 770-1070
National Suicide Prevention Hotline (800) 784 2433 or
(800) 273-8255
National Sexual Assault Hotline (800) 656-HOPE

Are you a young person of color? Feeling down, stressed or overwhelmed? Text STEVE to 741741

Are you a young person of color? Feeling down, stressed or overwhelmed?

Text STEVE to 741741 and a live, trained, trained Crisis Counselor will receive the text and respond to you quickly to provide support. The volunteer Crisis Counselor will help you move from a hot moment to a cool moment. Learn more.

ULifeline supplements the services provided by college counseling centers. It combines an online screening tool as well as a mental health reference library. You can learn signs and symptoms and get expert advice. You can access the website with the following link:

ULlogo XLearn more

You are not alone. No matter how challenging the times, you are not alone in South Carolina. Whatever you're struggling with - family pressures, work, relationship issues, grief, stress or financial concerns - it is easy to get overwhelmed without an idea of where to turn for support. We understand that many people are reluctant to seek help for mental health concerns so we made getting support as easy as . . . click, connect, chat. CLICK . . . Go to hope.connectsyou.org to get started. CONNECT . . . Take a questionnaire to receive feedback and support from a program counselor. CHAT . . . Exchange messages and learn about available resources and services. hope.connectsyou.org The South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SC DMH) and the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services (DAODAS) partnered with the American Foundation for Suicide PRevention (AFSP) to provide the Interactive Screening Program - a safe and easy service that allows you to anonymously take a Self-Check Questionnaire and connect with a professional counselor in the State of South Carolina who can provide guidance, support, and resources to help connect you with mental health and addiction services. This service is available to all residence of South Carolina 18 years of age or older.

Additional Resources

  • Journal Prompts to help you discover the impacts of COVID-19 on your life and the world.
  • Are you wondering what you are feeling right now? Do you feel wound-up tight, extra emotional, grumpy, overwhelmed, and/or angry. What we are feeling is grief and loss. Take the time to read this excellent article about what we are feeling and learn how to manage the emotions.
  • Mental Health Wellness Tips for Quarantine - check-out these tips for establishing your new normal during this uncertain time.
  • Check out these 5 Mindfulness Exercises to help you refocus, relax and settle.
  • Take a break from your online classes and try this Grounding with Your 5 Senses exercise.
  • Coping with Stress and Anxiety Amidst COVID-19
  • Adjusting your Study Habits for Online Learning - Check out this great resource to help you adjust your learning and study habits to fit online learning.

Drug and Alcohol Resources

How to talk to Someone in Emotional Distress

Click here to view Emergency Contacts & Resources

Show you care, connect on a feeling level, listen

  • “I’m concerned about you and noticed you haven’t been sleeping, eating, going to class, etc.”
  • “How are you feeling?”
  • Reflect back their feelings and paraphrase: “What I hear you saying is that you are in a great deal of pain and feel hopeless.”
  • “I’m glad you called.”
  • Listen with respect. Individuals in distress want understanding and care.

Ask about suicide directly

  • “Sometimes when people feel sad, they have thoughts of killing themselves. Have you had such thoughts?”
  • “Are you thinking of killing yourself?”
  • “Have you considered suicide?” “How would you go about it?” “When would you do that?”
  • Remember, asking about suicide does NOT put the idea in people’s minds.

Get help. Explore options. Offer resources.

  • “What would help now?” ”Who can, who usually helps?” “How can I help?”
  • Get assistance. Avoid trying to be the only lifeline for this person. Seek out resources even if it means breaking a confidence.
  • “How would you feel about seeing the Campus counselor? Let’s call right now. I’ll walk over with you to see the counselor.”